Skip to content

Mitigation measures are more effective if they are designed as an integral part of the scheme. If consideration of mitigation measures is left until later in the scheme design, this can increase costs as early opportunities for avoidance are missed.  

The 'Landscape Institute and Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment’s: Guidelines for Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment' includes principles on designing in mitigation to reduce impacts on landscape and visual amenity.  

Mitigation may either be: 

  • Primary measures that intrinsically comprise the development design – i.e. buffer zones.
  • Secondary measures designed to specifically address the remaining (residual) negative or adverse impacts – i.e. creating new landforms.

Mitigation measures can be reinforced by their adoption as conditions of approval, including as pre-commencement conditions (conditions that require compliance before development on site starts). Note: The long term protection of trees is best carried out by way of a TPO rather than by using a condition of a planning permission. 

Limits of mitigation

Not all impacts can be mitigated and mitigation in itself can lead to problems with a development. Monitoring of a development is essential to overcome and identify unanticipated problems as they arise. Problems with mitigation include: 

  • Mitigation measures e.g. planting can take considerable time to become effective. Realistic growth rates must be applied. Semi-mature vegetation can be planted if screening needs to be effective immediately but must be carefully managed to avoid failure. 
  • Mitigation measures may only be effective on a seasonal basis e.g. planting with deciduous trees.
  • Mitigation measures designed to overcome one adverse effect may give rise to other adverse effects e.g. planting can reduce openness or limit views to landmarks. This must be anticipated at the design stage.  
  • Mitigation measures can prove unfeasible to implement and the practicality of implementing these must be considered at the design stage through the identification of a suitable management plan. More information on this can be found in Stage 5 Design implementation and Management plans.

A standard hierarchy of mitigation measures is outlined below: 

Avoidance is the preferred mitigation method and can be achieved through careful site selection, siting and innovative design 

Reduction of impacts of development on the landscape can be achieved by setting the development into the ground and the implementation of sensitive design through the creation of new landforms 

Remediation should only be used where either Avoidance or Reduction cannot be achieved. It can be achieved through cosmetic measures such as screening and re-planting of native species.  

Compensation should only be considered as a last resort and only be used where impacts cannot be mitigated to an acceptable level. 

A robust assessment of the nature, value and extent of the resource that would be lost is required at the outset of the planning process so that lost features can be replaced appropriately. In many cases, true compensation is unlikely to be possible, e.g. new woodland may replace mature woodland but is unlikely to compensate for the loss of established habitat. 

Enhancement is always desirable and often used in conjunction with mitigation e.g. improved land management and the creation of new habitat areas.

 

Cookies

Like many other websites, we place small information files called 'cookies' on your computer.

Why do we use cookies?

To remember your settings, for example your language and location. This means you don’t have to keep entering these details when you visit a new page.

To find out how you use the site to help us update and improve it.

How do I change my cookie settings?

You can change the settings of your web browser so that it won’t accept cookies. For more information visit AboutCookies.org.

But, doing this may stop you from using some of the online features and services on this website. 

Cookies we use

Cookies do a lot of different jobs, and we use 2 types of cookies:

Required functionality cookies – these cookies are essential for the website to work.

Performance and feature cookies – these cookies help to improve the performance and feel of this website, for example providing you with personalised services.


Take a look at a list of cookies we use on our website:

NameTypeHow we use itHow long we use the information for

ASP.Net_Sessions

 

Required functionality

An automatic cookie set by our software. 

Just for the time you are on our website.

ServerID

 

Required functionality

An automatic cookie set by our software. 

Just for the time you are on our website.

_ga

Required functionality

To track the effectiveness of our website using Google Analytics. 

2 years

saved-pages

Performance and feature

To save the pages that you visit by clicking the heart at the top of the page. 

1 month

geoPostcode

Performance and feature

This stores your postcode (or partial postcode) when we ask you for your location.

Just for the time you are on our website or 30 days (you choose this).

geoCoordinates

Performance and feature

This stores your location as a pair of latitude / longitude coordinates.

Just for the time you are on our website or 30 days (you choose this).

reckonerName-history

Performance and feature

This keeps a history of all answers submitted to the ready reckoner.

This is set in the control for each ready reckoner. If you haven't interacted with the ready reckoner for the set amount of days, the cookies are deleted.

reckonerName-content

Performance and feature

This keeps a history of what content cards are clicked on when using the ready reckoner.

This is set in the control for each ready reckoner. If you haven't interacted with the ready reckoner for the set amount of days, the cookies are deleted.

SQ_SYSTEM_SESSION

Required functionality

This used to track user sessions on forms hosted on eservices.hertfordshire.gov.uk

Just for the time you are on our website.


Third party cookies

There are links and content from other sites and services on our website. These sites and services set their own cookies.

Below are a list of cookies that the other sites and services use:

Service namePurposeMore information

Google analytics (_utma/b/c/z)

These are used to compile reports for us on how people use this site.

Cookies of the same names are also used for the same purpose by other websites such as Building FuturesCountryside Management Service and Hertfordshire LIS.

Visit the Google Analytics website for more information about the cookies they use.

You can prevent data from being collected and used by Google Analytics by installing Google's Opt-out Browser Add-on.

Google Translation - googtrans

This cookie is used to remember which language to translate each page into if you have chosen to do so.

It expires at the end of your browser session.

Bing

We use a Bing cookie to track the success of our marketing campaigns and make them more efficient.

Visit Bing to find out more about their cookies.

Google

We use a Google cookie to track the success of our marketing campaigns and make them more efficient.

Visit Google to find out more about their cookies.

Facebook

We have a number of presences on Facebook, which we may link to. Facebook may set some of its own cookies if you follow these links.

Visit Facebook to find out more about their cookies.

Twitter

We have a number of presences and feeds on Twitter, which you may wish to follow or read from this website. Twitter may set some of its own cookies.

Visit Twitter to find out more about their cookies.

YouTube

We have a YouTube channel, which we may link to. YouTube may set some of its own cookies if you follow those links.

Visit YouTube to find out more about their cookies.

Netloan

This ASP.NET_Sessionid cookie is essential for the Netloan secure online payments website to work, and is set when you arrive to the site. This cookie is deleted when you close your browser.

 

HotJar

This session cookie is set to let Hotjar know whether that visitor is included in the sample which is used to generate funnels.

Visit HotJar to find out more about their cookies.

Siteimprove

These cookies are set to help us report on how people are using the site so we can improve it.

Visit Siteimprove to learn more about their cookies.