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Hertfordshire County Council

Sustainability, innovation and design excellence

Since 2009, the Hertfordshire Building Futures Awards have celebrated schemes at the forefront of sustainable design and construction, demonstrating a shared commitment to sustainable development in Hertfordshire by both the industry and local authorities.

We're delighted to announce the shortlisted schemes for the Hertfordshire Building Futures Awards 2018.

The awards recognise projects that demonstrate sustainability, innovation and high quality construction and design in response to environmental challenges.

A diverse range of entries were nominated across our 4 award categories. We'll have more detailed case studies on each shortlisted scheme to share with you in early September.

  • 29 Firs Walk – replacement dwelling – IDL Architecture
  • Artworks, Hitchin – residential  – Stride Treglown
  • Cassiobury Hub Building, Watford – multi-purpose building – Knox Bhavan Architects
  • Garden Avenue / Furzen Crescent, Hatfield – residential – Rock Townsend
  • Tudor Way, Hertford – estate regeneration – Alan Camp Architects
  • Science Building, Hatfield – University of Hertfordshire– Sheppard Robson
  • The Deerings, Harpenden - residential - Gresford Architects
  • The Reserve, Waltham Cross – residential – Broxbourne Council

  • Cassiobury Hub Building, Watford – multi-purpose building – Knox Bhavan Architects
  • Johnson Court, West Dene- Passivhaus – Mark Longworth
  • Science Building, Hatfield – University of Hertfordshire– Sheppard Robson
  • The Deerings, Harpenden - residential - Gresford Architects

  • St Albans Museum and Gallery– St Albans City & District Council
  • Apple Tree Farmhouse – refurbishment of listed dwelling - Roger Mears Architects

  • St Albans Museum and Gallery– St Albans City & District Council
  • St Albans Cathedral – conservation and enhancement – Richard Griffiths Architects
  • Cassiobury Hub Building, Watford – multi-purpose building – Knox Bhavan Architects

Winners will be announced at a prestigious awards ceremony on Thursday 4 October at Knebworth House. Limited tickets are available for this popular event, at a rate of £120 per guest. If you are interested in attending, please email the Building Futures Team at BFAwards18@hertfordshire.gov.uk.

Our judges from Hertfordshire Design Review Panel have a wealth of expertise in sustainability, architecture, landscape and urban design.

They assessed entries on their overall contribution to environmental sustainability. The following criteria are provided as a guide - entries are not required to meet all criteria.

Most sustainable construction

This award category is for projects that have made an exceptional contribution to environmental sustainability throughout their whole lifecycle: from early planning stages and construction, through to the completed build and consideration of future uses.

Submissions are assessed on their contribution to the environmental sustainability agenda incorporating innovative construction and design, and recognition of national sustainability standards.

Judges will take the following into account:

  • Achievement of nationally recognised levels of sustainability (e.g. BREEAM / Home Quality Mark / National technical standards for housing).
  • Use of best practice construction management to minimise impacts on the environment (i.e. registered with the Considerate Constructors Scheme).
  • Use of technological advances in construction to minimise impacts on the environment.
  • Use of lifecycle assessment tools within the design process.
  • Consideration of climate change projections and scenarios within the design process, recognition that buildings/spaces exist for numerous and varied climatic conditions throughout their operational life.
  • Considered climate change and adaptation within the open space strategy (e.g. use of drought tolerant species).
  • Use of energy modelling within the design process.
  • Reduced energy use through innovative design and materials (e.g. orientation of buildings to maximise solar gain, improve thermal performance).
  • Achievement of Energy Performance Ratings (e.g. Energy Performance Certificates/Display Energy Certificate).
  • Evidence that the gap between the design intent and the ‘as-built’ performance has been closed. It should be demonstrated that in-use energy consumption will be close to (or better than) the design predictions and that protocols such as soft landings (or equivalent) have been used to help achieve this objective.
  • Use of building management systems for heating/cooling, ventilation and lighting.
  • Use of on-site renewable energy systems (e.g. solar hot water, biomass, ground source heating and cooling, photovoltaic cells and wind power).
  • Use of innovative design to provide passive cooling (e.g. sustainable on-site/decentralised low carbon energy systems to reduce carbon emissions).
  • Reduction of water use during occupancy of the development (e.g. use of sub-meters and leak detection, installation of water saving devices, installation of rainwater harvesting and greywater systems).
  • Use of non-potable water for irrigation of landscape areas.
  • Use of sustainable drainage systems.
  • Installation of flood resilience measures.
  • Use of sustainable materials, including locally sourced materials where appropriate.
  • Use of materials/products that reduce the atmospheric impact of development (e.g. zero ozone depleting material, materials which avoid substances that have a global warming potential and avoid the use of VOC’s and other toxic compounds).
  • Consideration/flexibility for future uses.
  • Design measures to reduce the impact of noise (e.g. arrangement of sensitive areas away from areas of noise).
  • Design measures to enable effective waste management during occupancy of the development (e.g. provision of dedicated areas for recycling and waste storage).
  • Measures to minimise disruption and disturbance to on-site species.
  • Access throughout the development for non-motorised modes of transport.
  • Consideration of access to local services, public transport and other sustainable modes of transport.

Sponsored by Willmott Dixon Construction Limited

Design excellence

This award category is for new developments that demonstrate excellence in architectural design, build quality, landscaping and public and private space.

Submissions will be assessed on their design quality, creativity and original design, and how they complement the communities and landscapes in which they are situated.

Judges will take the following into account:

  • Excellence in architectural design, build quality, landscape and public and private space.
  • Creativity and originality.
  • Response to Hertfordshire’s distinctive local character.
  • Response to the built environment, landscape and topography of the local area in its layout, massing, scale, proportion and materials.
  • Creation of a safe, integrated, permeable and accessible environment.
  • Creation of places with a distinctive character, with recognisable. landmarks, a clear structure and where public and private spaces are well distinguished.
  • Provides a mix of tenure and building types, integrated within well planned public spaces to bring people together and provide opportunities for employment, recreation and leisure.
  • Building and street layout in larger schemes that prioritise pedestrians and enable a shift to walking, cycling and public transport.

Sponsored by Places for People

Retrofit for the future

 Judges will take the following into account:

  • Achievement of nationally recognised levels of sustainability (e.g. BREEAM / Home Quality Mark / National technical standards for housing).
  • Reduction in the environmental footprint and life cost of the building (including both operational and structural alterations).
  • Achievement of Energy Performance Ratings (e.g. Energy Performance Certificates/ Display Energy Certificate).
  • Reduced energy use through innovative design and materials (e.g. improvement of thermal performance).
  • Introduction of building management systems for heating/cooling, ventilation and lighting.
  • Reduction of water use during  occupancy of the development (e.g. use of sub-meters and leak detection, installation of water saving devices, installation of rainwater harvesting and greywater systems).
  • Use of innovative and sustainable techniques.
  • Introduction of sustainable materials including locally sourced materials where appropriate.
  • Introduction of materials/ products that reduce atmospheric impact of development (e.g. materials which avoid substances that have a global warming potential and avoid the use of VOC’s and other toxic compounds).
  • Improvement of the development's local setting and sense of place.
  • Evidence that retrofitting achieves greater environmental, social and economic benefits than demolition and rebuild.
  • Potential to repeat smaller projects at a larger scale.
  • Introduction of on-site renewable energy systems (e.g. solar hot water, biomass, ground source heating and cooling, photovoltaic cells and wind power).
  • Considered climate change and adaptation within ancillary open space (e.g. introduction of drought tolerant species).
  • Introduction of measures to enable effective waste management (e.g. dedicated recycling and waste storage).
  • Use of non-potable water for irrigation of landscape areas.
  • Sustainable drainage systems.
  • Flood resilience measures.
  • Consideration/flexibility for future uses.
  • Measures to reduce the impact of noise.

Sponsored by MHA MacIntyre Hudson

Project of the year

The judges come together to reward a scheme from across the award categories that they feel deserves special recognition for its outstanding commitment to environmental sustainability.

Judges will take into account aspects of the award criteria from all of the award categories.

Sponsored by BRE Group

 

Who are the judges?

Colin HealStaff pics - Colin 1

Director of ZEHo Projects Ltd., a sustainable project management consultancy

Colin’s passion for sustainability has developed throughout his career, working for both small and large contractors and consultancies.

He was part of the London 2012 Olympics’ delivery team, in which the importance of ‘legacy’ was behind every decision, from design, to planning and construction methodologies. 

After the government back tracked on their requirement that every new house built after 2016 be zero carbon, Colin set out to demonstrate that sustainability was relatively simple and affordable. In 2014, he and his wife started a project to build a sustainable, zero carbon home.

As a result, Colin won the 2016 Building Futures Award for the Most Sustainable Building Project.

This award validated the philosophy for the project and led to the formation of ZEHo Projects Ltd. Projects to date have varied, from initial advice on improving the carbon footprint of existing properties, to a £25m BREEAM Excellent refurbishment and extension to an office building constructed in cross laminated timber.  

David JenningsBFA15 David Jennings, Headshot 231015

Design Director at award winning practice EPR Architects

David has over 30 years experience as a Chartered Architect (RIBA) specialising in redevelopment in sensitive historical environments and listed buildings.

He has worked for a number of high profile architects including 11 years with James Stirling where he worked on the Stirling prize winning Stuttgart Music School and was team leader on the RIBA award winning Tate Liverpool.

At EPR David was responsible for designing Cardinal Place and creating a public realm and retail strategy that won the BCSC Gold Metal 2006 and the IAS/OAS office building of the year. David is currently overseeing the conversion of Lutyens Grade I listed former Midland Bank Building in the City of London into a luxury hotel for Soho House.

David sits on the Hertfordshire Design Review Panel, the committee of the Westminster Society reviewing major applications and has been a Civic Trust Awards Assessor for many years.

Jon Rowlandjon rowland

Director of Jon Rowland Urban Design Ltd.

Jon Rowland is a registered architect and urban designer. Areas of expertise include urban design and masterplanning; regeneration and urban renewal; development strategies; design advice and training nationally and internationally.

Projects include: award winning Telford Millennium Community; short-listed Cottam Hall in Preston, Stranraer Waterfront, and Temple Quay in Bristol. Other masterplans, spatial and urban design strategies include: completion of Frederick Gibberd's 1970 plan for Harlow, Culham Science Centre for UK Atomic Energy Authority; a coastal infrastructure masterplan for Rhosneigr; Urban Design Framework for Colindale for the Greater London Authority; spatial plans for Central Oxfordshire and Partnership for Urban South Hampshire. These are complex projects and Jon works with interdisciplinary teams to provide an integrated approach.

Jon is a Chair of CABE’s Design Review Panel. He has lectured extensively, is past Chair of the Urban Design Group, and was co-editor of Urban Design Futures (2006). He is a member of the Academy of Urbanism, Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and part of Urbed's team which won the Wolfson Economic Prize on Garden Cities.

Dr. David Strongdavid strong

Internationally recognised expert in sustainable building design and refurbishment and Director of David Strong Consulting Ltd.

Dr. David Strong has a wealth of knowledge about low/zero carbon buildings and is a specialist in whole system thinking, building physics and integrative design. His interest is in eco-minimalism and bio-mimicry –exploiting and optimising the use of natural systems for heating, cooling, ventilating and illuminating buildings. He also has expertise in the integration of renewable energy systems in the built environment, combined heat and power and district heating.

He was Managing Director of BRE Environment (1998 -2007) and Chief Executive of Inbuilt Consulting Ltd (2007 - 2010). He is currently a Visiting Professor at the University of Nottingham Department of Architecture and Built Environment and at the Oxford Institute for Sustainable Development. He was previously Chairman of the Energy Efficiency Partnership for Buildings. David was responsible for establishing the UK Green Building Council and was awarded the Building Sustainability Leadership Award in 2007.

In 2017 David's book ‘A Whole System Approach to High-Performance Green Buildings’ was published. 

The Building Futures Partnership are grateful to all of the award sponsors for their generous support.

Our headline sponsor, Hertfordshire Building Control, are owned by seven of Hertfordshire's local authorities and carry out services on their behalf. They ensure that all profit is returned to the authorities and invested back into local communities.

Hertfordshire Building Control logo

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MHA MacIntyre Hudson logo

 

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